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Old Mexican Bookends

19 Mar
Photo of Carved Mexican bookends

Old Mexican Bookends:  Wood containing iron weights.  Height woman 5.5 inches, man 6 inches. Five colors.  Unmarked.

This pair of bookends is unusual because they are a cut above the usual Mexican tourist bookends.  The bookends show a peasant man and  woman, huddled down under blankets or serapes.  The pair is hand-carved, and the carving is quite well done; the sombrero is given a concave brim and the faces are painstakingly shown.  It is old because all the paint is uniformly faded.

Old Mexican Bookends: the man’s serape is painted with a design reminiscent of Saltillo weavings, he wears a high-crowned hat. The woman’s rebozo drapes nicely down her back and ends in the typical fringe.  Notice the three plugs visible on the base.

Both bookend bases show plugs that have been used to seal borings into the wood. Holes had been drilled and iron weights inserted to make the bookends heavier.  (a magnet sticks to the base of either bookend).  Weights inserted into the bases of wooden bookends made in the USA are occasionally found, usually in Victorian-styled bookends displaying flowers.  But, who made these bookends; when and where were they made; are they folk art or a commercial effort?  Perhaps one of our followers can give us some information.

 

Sit and Sleep: Bookends of this general appearance are commonly seen in antique shops and shows.  The pair pictured here are early tourist fare, probably from the 1930s.  The tilt of the sombreros suggest the subjects are sleeping and eliminates the need to carve a face on the bookend. The hats are hinged and when tilted backwards, reveal a hollow interior containing a gray-metal slug that gives the bookend more weight.  This caricature of a sleeping Mexican, became widely popular in the United States in the mid-twentieth century.

 

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