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Category Archives: Art Deco

FRANKART Beauty: Semiclassical and Streamlined

WPA/AMERICAN MODERNE STREAMLINED LADIES: Grey metal, Height 5.5 inches.  Inscription: FRANKART INC.  circa 1935.

In nineteen thirties America, streamlining was the most prominent feature of Art Deco fashions.  The American/WPA Moderne art style was a subset of Art Deco.  Here we have bookends showing a bust of a streamlined lady on a Deco geometric, stairstep base with a semi-classical face that belongs to  American/WPA Moderne.  (Compare to the faces in our Post from June 3, 2014, entitled WPA Moderne Bookends.)  The bookends are FRANKART’s contribution to both styles at once.

 

 
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Posted by on November 15, 2017 in Art Deco, Streamline

 

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Made-in-Japan Mexican Bookends

Japanese Mexican bookends:  porcelain, Height 6 inches. Made In Japan.

Each bookend in this pair shows a Mexican peon sitting against saguaro cacti.  We know he is Mexican because of his characteristic sombrero and his sitting in the desert.  We expect his face to look like the popular conception of a Mexican – swarthy with a mustache, but instead we see a light-skinned, clean-shaven, blue-eyed face, quite caucasian in appearance.  These bookends were made in Japan, so we can guess that the artist had no familiarity with actual look of Mexican peons.

The painted details on this bookend are very nice.

In the late 1920s and into the 1930s and 40s, a popular home decor in the American southwest was a kitschy amalgam of mission, cowboy, and Mexican motifs. Table cloths, table settings, home decorations all incorporated variations of the theme. These bookends fit beautifully into what could be called, “Mexico In The American Imagination”, a phrase taken from the SOUTH OF THE BORDER traveling exhibition mounted by the Yale University Art Gallery in 1993 and 1994.

A vintage Mexican motif table cloth with a page from Mexican Cookbook by Erna Fergusson, published by the Univ. of New Mexico Press, 1934.

Before World War II, Japan was making porcelain decorative items for export to the United States and Europe. These bookends appear to be from that period and made for the American market. They are nicely detailed and hand-painted. The stamp, Made In Japan, is one that could be pre-1941 according to the Kovel’s website. The Kovel’s indicate that 1921 is when the US government began to require the Country of Origin be in English and the Japanese started using Japan instead of Nippon. After the war the stamp “Made in Occupied Japan” was used until 1952. The quality of these bookends would indicate pre-war. We like them even though their light weight doesn’t bode well for holding up books.

Made In Japan mark.

 

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FRUIT BASKET: American Art Deco Bookends

The ornamental image of a bounteous fruit basket was popularized at the International Exhibition of Modern Decorative and Industrial Arts (Paris 1925) along with the iconic images of leaping gazelles, chevrons, zig zags, and the sunburst.  Later, in 1966, the term Art Deco was proposed to describe all the art which had been done from 1925 through about 1946, and so these images took the identity of early French Art Deco.  The influence of the 1925 Paris Exhibition quickly became apparent in home decor. American bookend manufacturers were early adopters and distributors of these new and beautiful designs and styles.

These nicely cast FRUIT BASKET bookends, with their appearance of a well-painted still life on a background of french blue and resting on stylized leaves, are obviously a salute to the French decorative image.

FRUIT BASKET:  Iron, Height 5.5 inches.  Inscription: 9860 and a mark of a J with a c on one side of the J and and an o on the other.  Foundry:  Judd Co.  circa 1927.

Judd Company Maker’s Mark and Number

A second example of early Art Deco are these Hubley SUNBURST bookends.

SUNBURST:  Iron, Height 4.5 inches, Inscription 589, Foundry, Hubley circa 1927.

 

Click here to view our February 2016 post on Leaping Gazelles. 

 

 

 
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Posted by on July 14, 2017 in Art Deco

 

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Art Deco Revere Double Scroll Bookends

Double Scroll Bookends: Painted wood and steel.  Height 5 inches, Foundry:  Revere Copper and Brass Co.  Fred D. Farr designer. 1935.

Art Deco, Clean, Modern, Geometric are all styles trending in home decor. These Double Scroll Bookends designed by Fred D. Farr for the Revere Copper and Brass Company illustrate high-style American Art Deco from 1935 by their geometric appearance, bright paint, and shining metal.  They belong in any room with Art Deco decor and in any collection of Art Deco bookends.

In recent forays to modernism and antique venues The Bookend Collector has noticed an up-tick in the number of Art Deco Scroll Bookends for sale. These spring-loaded, rolled steel, scroll bookends are iconic examples of a period of Art Deco design in American manufacturing. Check out examples found in museum exhibits by clicking on the following links.

Scroll Bookend in the David Owsley Museum of Art Collection, Ball State University.

Expanding Bookend in the Cooper Hewitt, Product Design and Decorative Arts Department, Collection.

Here are 2 further examples of  Revere Scroll Bookends from our book, BOOKENDS: Objects of Art and Fashion.

 

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Monk Bookends: We missed out!

Really enjoyed our perusal of the booths at the Portland Expo Antique Show.  However, we missed out on a pair of very attractive bookends that we would have loved to have added to our collection.  When we first passed Silver Bear Antiques’ booth, they were not yet unpacked.  On the second pass they had been purchased just minutes before we saw them.  Just goes to show that luck and early attendance are not always in sync.  Somewhere someone has a really nice pair.

 

 

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Sitting Ladies Bookends

 

Sitting Ladies: Grey metal, Height 7 inches, Inscription: Janle and Made in France. circa 1925.  Janle is suspected to be a pseudonym for Max Le Verrier.

Sitting Ladies: Grey metal, Height 7 inches, Inscription: Janle and Made in France. circa 1925.  Janle is suspected to be a pseudonym for Max Le Verrier.

These Art deco bookends are large, well-cast and beautiful, and would be desirable with no further provenance.  But, in addition, they are signed by the french artist Janle and were cast by the prominent french foundry of Le Verrier, all of which makes them high-end productions.

Impressed "Janle" inscription and "Made In France".

Impressed “Janle” inscription and “Made In France”.

 
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Posted by on June 20, 2016 in Art Deco, Art Styles

 

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Chuck De Costa: Bookend Collector Extraordinaire

 

Chuck De Costa was a major player in the world of bookend collectors.  He amassed a great collection of beautiful and significant bookends, somewhere north of 2400 pairs.  He was generous in sharing his collection and knowledge with other collectors.  He was the author of the Collector’s Encyclopedia of Bookends.  The following announcement was made on his Antique Bookend Collection website:

“It is with sadness that I must report that Chuck De Costa, the Antiques Bookend Collector passed away on December 4, 2015. This site will remain for a short time to honor his love and knowledge of Antique Bookends. This site has been developed to share with other antique bookend collectors & enthusiasts. Whatever your favorites might be we hope that you enjoy this website and share it with your friends.”

As a tribute to Chuck we hope you all will take time to visit the site before it is taken down.

Chuck De Costa’s Antique Bookend Collection

 

 

 

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